Underground Aquifers: The Great Lakes Beneath Our Feet
Have a little good news!
Before you start saving the environment, you have to understand it, and the learning process begins during childhood.
States of Water
brutalgeneration:

Austria (by aenimation)
cabinporn:

Budding roof forest in Sitka, Alaska by Peter Baker.

cabinporn:

Budding roof forest in Sitka, Alaska by Peter Baker.

My Lake Has Invasive Species, Now What?

-little-owl-:

If this isn’t an entrance to a fairy world then I don’t know what is…

Fairy Glen, Isle of Skye, Scotland, April 2014

dendroica:

Beyond Honeybees: Now Wild Bees and Butterflies May Be in Trouble

Wild bees and butterflies are out on the landscape, making them difficult to count, and a lack of historical baselines makes it challenging to detect long-term trends. Slowly but surely, though, results from field studies and anecdotal reports from experts are piling up. They don’t paint a pretty picture. Many pollinator populations seem to be dwindling.
According to a recent survey organized by the Xerces Society, an invertebrate conservation group, nearly one-third of North American bumblebee species are declining. Other studies have reported similar trends, documenting dramatic declines in once-common species such as the American bumblebee. If that’s happening to bumblebees, says Xerces Society executive director Scott Black, it’s quite possible, even likely, that others are hurting, too.
“There’s very little information status on most of the bees other than bumblebees, but if you look at the life histories of these groups, many are likely even more sensitive to the disturbances leading to the declines, such as pesticides and habitat loss,” Black said. “Although we don’t know what’s going on with all bees, I think we could be seeing real problems.”
Among other pollinators, iconic monarch butterfly declines are well documented: Their numbers are now at a small fraction of historical levels. And entomologist Art Shapiro of the University of California, Davis spent most of the last four decades counting butterflies across central California, and found declines in every region. These declines don’t just involve butterflies that require very specific habitats or food sources, and might be expected to be fragile, but so-called generalist species thought to be highly adaptable. Many other entomologists have told Black the same thing.
“Species that used to be in all our yards are dropping out, but nobody’s monitoring them,” Black said.

(via WIRED)
Photo: Melissodes druriella by Sam Droege/USGS.

dendroica:

Beyond Honeybees: Now Wild Bees and Butterflies May Be in Trouble

Wild bees and butterflies are out on the landscape, making them difficult to count, and a lack of historical baselines makes it challenging to detect long-term trends. Slowly but surely, though, results from field studies and anecdotal reports from experts are piling up. They don’t paint a pretty picture. Many pollinator populations seem to be dwindling.

According to a recent survey organized by the Xerces Society, an invertebrate conservation group, nearly one-third of North American bumblebee species are declining. Other studies have reported similar trends, documenting dramatic declines in once-common species such as the American bumblebee. If that’s happening to bumblebees, says Xerces Society executive director Scott Black, it’s quite possible, even likely, that others are hurting, too.

“There’s very little information status on most of the bees other than bumblebees, but if you look at the life histories of these groups, many are likely even more sensitive to the disturbances leading to the declines, such as pesticides and habitat loss,” Black said. “Although we don’t know what’s going on with all bees, I think we could be seeing real problems.”

Among other pollinators, iconic monarch butterfly declines are well documented: Their numbers are now at a small fraction of historical levels. And entomologist Art Shapiro of the University of California, Davis spent most of the last four decades counting butterflies across central California, and found declines in every region. These declines don’t just involve butterflies that require very specific habitats or food sources, and might be expected to be fragile, but so-called generalist species thought to be highly adaptable. Many other entomologists have told Black the same thing.

“Species that used to be in all our yards are dropping out, but nobody’s monitoring them,” Black said.

(via WIRED)

Photo: Melissodes druriella by Sam Droege/USGS.

travelingcolors:

Peaceful River, Alfavatn Lake | Iceland (by Laurent DELCEY)
States of Water: Helping Kids Understand and Get Involved with the Environment